Peter Fratzl How Does the Interaction of Water with Collagen Lead to Pretension in Our Connective Tissues?

Peter Fratzl is Director of the Department of Biomaterials at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces. He is also Chair of the Chemistry-Physics-Engineering Section of the Max Planck Society as well as a Member of the Hermann von Helmholtz Centre for Cultural Techniques, Humboldt University Berlin. In 2015, he was elected as Member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities. His research focus includes biomimetic materials and bone and mineral research with biomedical applications. Up to date, he has published more than 450 articles and books. He was awarded the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize in 2010.

Area of Research

Biomimetic Materials, Bone and Mineral Research, Composite Materials

Luca Bertinetti, Admir Masic, Roman Schuetz, Aurelio Barbetta, Britta Seidt, Wolfgang Wagermaier and Peter Fratzl. "Osmotically Driven Tensile Stress in Collagen-based Mineralized Tissues." Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials 52 (2015): 14-21.  
Admir Masic, Luca Bertinetti, Roman Schuetz, Shu-Wei Chang, Till Hartmut Metzger, Markus J. Buehler and Peter Fratzl. "Osmotic Pressure Induced Tensile Forces in Tendon Collagen." Nature Communications 6 (2015).  
Jean-Baptiste Forien, Claudia Fleck, Peter Cloetens, Georg Duda, Peter Fratzl, Emil Zolotoyabko and Paul Zaslansky. "Compressive Residual Strains in Mineral Nanoparticles as a Possible Origin of Enhanced Crack Resistance in Human Tooth Dentin." Nano Letters 15 (2015): 3729-3734.  

since 2003

Director

Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces

Department of Biomaterials

since 2004

Honorary Professor of Physics

Humboldt University of Berlin (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin)

since 2009

Honorary Professor

University of Potsdam (Universität Potsdam)

1986-1998

Assistant and Associate Professor

University of Vienna

Institute for Materials Physics

1981-1985

Researcher

Austrian Academy of Sciences

1983

PhD in Physics

University of Vienna

1980

Diploma

École Polytechnique, Paris

Chair of the Chemistry-Physics-Engineering Section of the Max Planck Society (2017 - 2020)

Member of Hermann v. Helmholtz-Zentrum für Kulturtechnik, Humboldt University Berlin (since 2015)

Acting Director, MPI for Microstructure Physics, Halle/Saale (2010 - 2014)

Chair of Metal Physics at the University of Leoben (Austria) and Director of the Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (1998 - 2003)

Scientific Advisor to the Director of the "Ludwig Boltzmann-Institute of Osteology", Vienna (1993)

Prizes

Election as Member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Science and Humanities (2015)

Election as Member of the Academy of Science and Literature / Mainz (2015)

Election as Member of the German Academy of Science and Engineering (ACATECH) (2013)

Jerome B. Cohen Distinguished Lecture Series, Northwestern University, Evanston, USA (2013)

Doctor Honoris Causa, University of Montpellier, France (2010)

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz-Preis (2010)

Max Planck Research Prize for Pioneering Work on Biological and Bio-inspired Materials (with Prof. Robert Langer, MIT) (2008)

Erwin Ühlinger Memorial Lecture, German Osteological Society (2008)

Election as Corresponding Member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (2007)

Herbert Johnson Memorial Lectures, Cornell University, Ithaka, USA (2007)

Seidman Family Memorial Lectures, Technion, Haifa, Israel (2007)

Byk-Tosse Osteology Award (2000)

Lilian B. Clark Lectureship, University of Texas at Dallas, USA (1998)

Copp-Award of the German Osteological Society (1997)

Austrian Government Award for Research in Rheumatology (1995)

Erich Schmid Award of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (1988)

Fellowships

Election as Fellow of the Materials Research Society (MRS), USA (2012)

Visiting Research Fellow at the Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh (1993 - 1994)

© Maximilian Dörrbecker

Max Planck Society


"The Max Planck Society is Germany's most successful research organization. Since its establishment in 1948, no fewer than 18 Nobel laureates have emerged from the ranks of its scientists, putting it on a par with the best and most prestigious research institutions worldwide. The more than 15,000 publications each year in internationally renowned scientific journals are proof of the outstanding research work conducted at Max Planck Institutes – and many of those articles are among the most-cited publications in the relevant field." (Source)

Institute

Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces

The Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces was founded in 1992. Research in Colloid and Interface Science is widely covered by the following Departments: Biomaterials, Biomolecular Systems, Colloid Chemistry and Theory & Bio-Systems, the Max Planck Research Group Mechano(bio)chemistry and the Emeritus Group (Interfaces). Current research topics are polymeric films, membranes, microcapsules, organic and inorganic nanostructures, biomineralization, nano- and microreactors, molecular motors and filaments as well as chemistry and biology of carbohydrates. Biomimetic research is at the core of the Institute’s activity. Common goal is to learn from nature how to build hierarchical materials or active systems with new functionalities, with adaptive, self-healing or self-assembling properties. (Source)

Map

The connective tissues in our body – such as skin, tendon, or bones – all contain a molecule called collagen. When you cut your skin, it springs open. This shows that the tissues in our body are under pretension. The research presented in this video is interested in the question of whether the interaction of collagen with water causes this tension. The researchers found, as PETER FRATZL explains, that the pretension comes from the contraction of the collagen molecules which is due to a competition for water between collagen and the sugar-rich molecules that surround them. By using synchrotron diffraction, the group managed to show that this leads to a conformational change of this helix; it shortens and creates enormous stresses. These findings are relevant for research in regenerative medicine as well as research into the uses of osmotic pressure for complex movements and force generation more generally.

LT Video Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.21036/LTPUB10399

Water-mediated Collagen and Mineral Nanoparticle Interactions Guide Functional Deformation of Human Tooth Dentin

  • Jean-Baptiste Forien, Ivo Zizak, Claudia Fleck, Ansgar Petersen, Peter Fratzl, Emil Zolotoyabko and Paul Zaslansky
  • Chemistry of Materials
  • Published in 2016

Chicago

Jean-Baptiste Forien, Ivo Zizak, Claudia Fleck, Ansgar Petersen, Peter Fratzl, Emil Zolotoyabko and Paul Zaslansky. "Water-mediated Collagen and Mineral Nanoparticle Interactions Guide Functional Deformation of Human Tooth Dentin." Chemistry of Materials 28 (2016): 3416-3427.