Jean-Jacques Hublin How Could the Modern Human Succeed over Other Hominids?

Jean-Jacques Hublin is Director of the Department of Human Evolution at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig (Germany). Hublin has taught at a number of International institutions, such as Leiden University (Netherlands), the University of California at Berkley, Harvard University (both USA), as well as the University of Bordeaux and since 2014 at the Collège de France in Paris. Hublin is doing extensive research on the evolution of Neanderthals and how their development intersects with that of the modern human. Between 2000 and 2003, he was Deputy Director of Anthropology, Prehistory and Paleo-environmental Sciences at the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (France), the largest science agency in Europe.

Area of Research

Evolutionary Anthropology, Human Evolution

Jean-Jacques Hublin. "The Origin of Neandertals." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106 (2009): 16022-16027.  
Tanya M. Smith, Paul Tafforeau, Donald J. Reid, Rainer Grün, Stephen Eggins, Mohamed Boutakiout and Jean-Jacques Hublin. "Earliest Evidence of Modern Human Life History in North African Early Homo Sapiens." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104 (2007): 6128-6133.  
Tanya M. Smith, Paul Tafforeau, Donald J. Reid, Joane Pouech, Vincent Lazzari, John P. Zermeno, Debbie Guatelli-Steinberg, Anthony J. Olejniczak, Almut Hoffman and Jakov Radovčić. "Dental Evidence for Ontogenetic Differences Between Modern Humans and Neanderthals." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 107 (2010): 20923-20928.  
Tanya M. Smith, Michel Toussaint, Donald J. Reid, Anthony J. Olejniczak and Jean-Jacques Hublin. "Rapid Dental Development in a Middle Paleolithic Belgian Neanderthal." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104 (2007): 20220-20225.  
Philipp Gunz, Simon Neubauer, Bruno Maureille and Jean-Jacques Hublin. "Brain Development After Birth Differs Between Neanderthals and Modern Humans." Current Biology 20 (2010): R921-R922.  

since 2014

International Chair of Palaeoanthropology

Collège du France, Paris

since 2010

Part-Time Professor

Leiden University

since 2006

Honorary Professor

Leipzig University (Universität Leipzig)

since 2005

Director

Max Planck Society (more details)

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

2000-2003

Professor

University of Bordeaux (Université de Bordeaux)

1993-2000

Director of Research

French National Center for Scientific Research (Centre national de la recherche scientifique)

UMR 152, UPR2147

1985-1993

Senior Researcher

French National Center for Scientific Research (Centre national de la recherche scientifique)

URA 49, UMR 152

1981-1985

Junior Researcher

French National Center for Scientific Research (Centre national de la recherche scientifique)

URA 49

1980-1981

Research Fellow

French National Center for Scientific Research (Centre national de la recherche scientifique)

At Université Pierre et Marie Curie

1976-1978

Research Fellow

DGRST at Université Pierre et Marie Curie

1991

Habilitation in Anthropology

University of Bordeaux (Université de Bordeaux)

1978

PhD in Vertebrate and Human Palaeontology

Pierre and Marie Curie University (Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie)

1976

Master in Vertebrate Palaeontology and Human Palaeontology

Pierre and Marie Curie University (Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie)

1975

Bachelor in Geology

Pierre and Marie Curie University (Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie)

American Journal of Physical Anthropology

Bulletins et mémoires de la Société d'Anthropologie de Paris

Journal of Human Evolution

Nature

PNAS

Science

Prizes

Listed as Thompson Reuters Highly Cited Researcher, Top 1% in His Field (2014)

Rudopf Virchow Award, Prinz Maximilian zu Wied-Stiftung, RGZM Mainz (2013)

ARC #DP1092843: “A Tale of Two Species: Constructing Chronologies for Patterns of Change in the Behaviour of Neanderthals and Early Modern Humans” (Co-PI)

NSF #BCS-093549199: "Assessing the Faunal and Lithic Assemblages and Chronology of the Smugglers' Cave Site" (Co-PI) (2009)

Marie Curie Actions MRTN-CT-2005-019564, European Virtual Anthropology Network (Co-PI) (2006-2009)

© Maximilian Dörrbecker

Max Planck Society


"The Max Planck Society is Germany's most successful research organization. Since its establishment in 1948, no fewer than 18 Nobel laureates have emerged from the ranks of its scientists, putting it on a par with the best and most prestigious research institutions worldwide. The more than 15,000 publications each year in internationally renowned scientific journals are proof of the outstanding research work conducted at Max Planck Institutes – and many of those articles are among the most-cited publications in the relevant field." (Source)

Institute

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

"The Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology unites scientists with various backgrounds (natural sciences and humanities) whose aim is to investigate the history of humankind from an interdisciplinary perspective with the help of comparative analyses of genes, cultures, cognitive abilities, languages and social systems of past and present human populations as well as those of primates closely related to human beings". (Source)

Map

Modern humans colonized the whole planet and replaced all other hominids, such as Neanderthals. This evolvement raises interesting evolutionary questions concerning both species. The paleoanthropological research presented in this video looks at a moment in time when both co-existed. In order to find out about the differences between them, JEAN-JACQUES HUBLIN looks at both species’ use of technology, behavior, and social organization using molecular screening techniques and archeological research. While it has often been argued that the replacement of Neanderthals by the modern human occurred due to the modern human’s strong evolutionary superiority, this research counters that precisely because they once co-existed, Neanderthals must be more complex than previously assumed.

LT Video Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.21036/LTPUB10306

The Modern Human Colonization of Western Eurasia: When and Where?

  • Jean-Jacques Hublin
  • Quaternary Science Reviews
  • Published in 2015

Chicago

Jean-Jacques Hublin. "The Modern Human Colonization of Western Eurasia: When and Where?" Quaternary Science Reviews 118 (2015): 194-210.