Stefan H. E. Kaufmann Can Biosignatures Be Used to Develop a Reliable, Fast and Low-Cost Test for Tuberculosis?

Stefan H.E. Kaufmann is a Founding Director of the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, and Professor for Microbiology and Immunology at the Charité University Clinics, Berlin. Kaufmann used to be the president of the German Society for Immunology and is a member of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. As a leading researcher in the field of immunology, Kaufmann identifies tuberculosis as a continued health threat and explores how to make tuberculosis treatments more affordable and effective in the face of multi-resistant tuberculosis.

Area of Research

Immunology

Pedro Moura-Alves, Kellen Faé, Erica Houthuys, Anca Dorhoi, Annika Kreuchwig, Jens Furkert, Nicola Barison, Anne Diehl, Antje Munder, Patricia Constant, Tatsiana Skrahina, Ute Guhlich-Bornhof, Marion Klemm et al. "AhR Sensing of Bacterial Pigments Regulates Antibacterial Defence." Nature 512 (2014): 387-392.  
Peter Mombaerts, Jörg Arnoldi, Friedemann Russ, Susumu Tonegawa and Stefan H.E. Kaufmann. "Different Roles of Alpha Beta and Gamma Delta T Cells in Immunity Against an Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen." Nature 365 (1993): 53-56.  
Jeroen Maertzdorf, January Weiner, Hans-Joachim Mollenkopf, TBornotTB Network, Torsten Bauer, Antje Prasse, Joachim Müller-Quernheim and Stefan H.E. Kaufmann. "Common Patterns and Disease-Related Signatures in Tuberculosis and Sarcoidosis." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 109 (2012): 7853-7858.  
Jürgen Hess, Diana Miko, André Catic, Vera Lehmensiek, David G. Russell and Stefan H.E. Kaufmann. "Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin Strains Secreting Listeriolysin of Listeria Monocytogenes." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 95 (1998): 5299-5304.  

since 1998

Professor

Humboldt University of Berlin (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin)

Charité, Medical Faculty

since 1993

Founding Director

Max Planck Society (more details)

Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology

1991-1998

Full Professor and Chair

University of Ulm (Universität Ulm)

Department of Immunology

1987-1991

Professor

University of Ulm (Universität Ulm)

Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology

1982-1987

Staff Scientist

Max Planck Society (more details)

Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics

1982

University Assistant

Free University of Berlin (Freie Universität Berlin)

Institute for Medical Microbiology

1981-1987

Associate Professor

Free University of Berlin (Freie Universität Berlin)

Institute for Medical Microbiology

1978-1981

Assistant Professor

Free University of Berlin (Freie Universität Berlin)

1976-1978

Scientific Assistant

Ruhr University Bochum (Ruhr-Universität Bochum)

Institute for Medical Microbiology

1981

Habilitation in Microbiology and Immunology

Free University of Berlin (Freie Universität Berlin)

1977

PhD

Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz (Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz)

1973

Diploma in Biology

Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz (Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz)

American Academy of Microbiology

American Society for Microbiology

Berlin–Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities

European Academy of Sciences

European Molecular Biology Organization

European Network of Immunology Institutes

German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina

German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology

German Society for Immunology

International Academy of Sciences of Nature and Society

Medical Society of Berlin

Microbiology Society of Berlin

New York Academy of Sciences

Society for Mucosal Immunology

Prizes

The University of Amsterdam Spinoza Leerstoel Medicine Award (2014)

Gardner Middlebrook Award (2014)

Honorate Doctor Université de la Mediterranée, Marseille (2007)

Honorary Medal of the Robert Koch Institute (2005)

Eijkman Medal, University of Utrecht (2004)

Dr. Friedrich Sasse Prize (2003)

Main Prize of the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (1993)

Pettenkofer-Prize (1992)

Dr. Robert Pfleger-Prize (1992)

Merckle Research Prize (1991)

Smith Kline Beecham Prize (1991)

Aronson Prize Berlin (1988)

Alfried Krupp Award for young professors (1987)

Research Prize of the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (1983)

Dr. Friedrich Sasse Prize (1981)

Fellowships

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh (2014)

Innovative Medicines Initiative JU Integrated Project "PreDict‐TB" (IMI 115337) (since 2012)

Innovative Medicines Initiative JU Integrated Project "BioVacSafe" (IMI 115308) (since 2012)

EDCTP Network "TB‐TEA" (MS.2010.18000,002), Project Coordinator (since 2011)

EU Large‐Scale Integrating Project "ADITEC" (HEALTH‐F4‐2011‐280873) (since 2011)

Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) German‐South African Collaboration “Cell specific biomarkers of TB”, SUA 10 038 (since 2011)

EU Large‐Scale Integrating Project "NEWTBVAC" (HEALTH‐F3‐2009‐241745), Chair of the Scientific Steering Group (since 2010)

EU Large‐Scale Integrating Project "SysteMTb" (HEALTH‐F4‐2010‐241587) (since 2010)

BMBF German‐Indian Collaboration “Studies on early and late signalling events in the pathogenesis of TB”, IND 10‐028 (since 2010)

EU "I3" Project  "TRANSVAC" (FP7‐INFRASTRUCTURES‐2008‐1‐228403) (since 2009)

EDCTP Integrated Project "AE‐TBC" (IP‐09‐32040‐011) (since 2010)

EU CSA PRD – “Poverty Related Diseases College” (HEALTH‐F3‐2009‐223581) (since 2009)

NIH/NIAID Grant “A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research” (NIH # HHSN27220080059C), Subaward 22520720‐41466‐B (since 2008)

EU Collaborative Project “PHAGOSYS ‐ Systems Biology of Phagosome Formation and Maturation, Modulation by Intracellular Pathogens” (HEALTH‐F4‐2008‐223451) (since 2008)

BMBF Competence Network “Pulmonary Tuberculosis – Host and Pathogen Determinants of Resistance and Disease Progression” (since 2007)

© Maximilian Dörrbecker

Max Planck Society


"The Max Planck Society is Germany's most successful research organization. Since its establishment in 1948, no fewer than 18 Nobel laureates have emerged from the ranks of its scientists, putting it on a par with the best and most prestigious research institutions worldwide. The more than 15,000 publications each year in internationally renowned scientific journals are proof of the outstanding research work conducted at Max Planck Institutes – and many of those articles are among the most-cited publications in the relevant field." (Source)

Institute

Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology

"The Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology was founded in 1993. The Institute commenced its operation in a provisional laboratory facility and a small group of scientists that has greatly expanded over the years, and relocated to an especially built facility in summer 2000."

"Infectious diseases continue to be the number one cause of death world-wide. Nearly one third of the cases of death caused by infectious diseases are attributable to "the big three", namely AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis.
In addition, new infectious diseases are arising and proving themselves to have major effects on society, such as Helicobacter pylori, the etiologic agent of infectious gastritis, or Chlamydia, the causative agents of various infections. Efficacious vaccines against most infectious agents are not available up to date, at the same time, the potential of available vaccines has been exhausted. The development and widespread use of antibiotics and other medications have contributed to the rise and spread of resistant strains.
Multidisciplinary research into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of infection is not only basic science, but also applied research essential for the development of novel preventative and therapeutic measures against infections, directly affecting the health and social problems of the present and future.
The Institute employs multi-disciplinary approaches to infection biology, comprising concepts and methodologies of molecular genetics, immunology, cell biology, epidemiology, clinical research and protein chemistry. The Institute promotes the applications of its research towards paving the way for the design of rational measures of control of infectious diseases." (Source)

Map

Tuberculosis is still a major health issue and the number one killer of all contagious diseases. But while more than 2 billion people are infected with the tuberculosis agent, only 10% develop an active disease. Current diagnostic tests cannot distinguish between infected people and people with active tuberculosis. In this video, STEFAN H. E. KAUFMANN explains that they found a characteristic gene expression profile of people infected with tuberculosis. Relying on only four markers they developed a highly sensitive method that is not only able to identify people with active tuberculosis but is also suitable for point of care application in countries with low resources.

LT Video Publication DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21036/LTPUB10210

Concise Gene Signature for Point-Of-Care Classification of Tuberculosis

  • Jeroen Maertzdorf, Gayle McEwen, January Weiner, Song Tian, Eric Lader, Ulrich Schriek, Harriet Mayanja-Kizza, Martin Ota, John Kenneth and Stefan H.E. Kaufmann
  • EMBO Molecular Medicine
  • Published in 2015

Chicago

Jeroen Maertzdorf, Gayle McEwen, January Weiner, Song Tian, Eric Lader, Ulrich Schriek, Harriet Mayanja-Kizza, Martin Ota, John Kenneth and Stefan H.E. Kaufmann. "Concise Gene Signature for Point-Of-Care Classification of Tuberculosis." EMBO Molecular Medicine 8 (2015): 86-95.