Neysan Rafat Is the Course of a Sepsis Influenced by the Mobilization of Endothelial Progenitor Cells?

Neysan Rafat is a doctor at the University Clinic Heidelberg, Germany. He specializes in Pediatrics, Nephrology, and Emergency Medicine. In 2009, Rafat won the Young Investigator Award of the Medical Faculty Heidelberg, followed by the Fokko van der Woude Research Grant of the German Kidney Foundation in 2010. In his current research, Rafat focuses on the course of a Sepsis, reviewing the research done and exploring further research that could help move the knowledge on Sepsis.

Area of Research

Endothelial Dysfunction and Regeneration, Vascular Stem Cell Biology, Vascular Stem Cell Therapy

Neysan Rafat, Grietje C. Beck, Pablo G. Peña-Tapia, Peter Schmiedek and Peter Vajkoczy. "Increased Levels of Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Patients with Moyamoya Disease." Stroke 40 (2009): 432-438.  
Neysan Rafat, Grietje C. Beck, Jutta Schulte, Jochen Tuettenberg and Peter Vajkoczy. "Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Malignant Gliomas." Journal of Neurosurgery 112 (2010): 43-49.  
Neysan Rafat, Burkhard Tönshoff, Angelika Bierhaus and Grietje C. Beck. "Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Regeneration after Acute Lung Injury: Do They Play a Role?" American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology 48 (2013): 399-405.  
Christian Betzen, Kathrin Plotnicki, Farnoosh Fathalizadeh, Kirk Pappan, Thomas Fleming, Martina Bielaszewska, Helge Karch, Burkhard Tönshoff and Neysan Rafat. "Shiga Toxin 2a-Induced Endothelial Injury in Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Metabolomic Analysis." Journal of Infectious Diseases 213 (2016): 1031-1040.  

since 2015

Specialist for Pediatrics

Heidelberg University (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg)

General Pediatrics, Pediatric Neurology, Metabolism, Gastroenterology, Nephrology

since 2010

Junior Group Leader

Heidelberg University (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg)

General Pediatrics, Pediatric Neurology, Metabolism, Gastroenterology, Nephrology

2009-2011

Postdoctoral Fellow

Heidelberg University (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg)

Department of Internal Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry

2009-2015

Resident

Heidelberg University (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg)

General Pediatrics, Pediatric Neurology, Metabolism, Gastroenterology, Nephrology

2007-2009

PhD-Student

University of Groningen

Department of Pathology and Medical Biology

2004-2007

Doctoral Student

University of Mannheim (Universität Mannheim)

Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine

2009

PhD in Medical Biology

University of Groningen

2007

MD (Dr. med.)

Heidelberg University (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg)

2007

State Exame in Medicine

Heidelberg University (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg)

German Society of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine

German Society of Pediatric Nephrology

German Society of Nephrology

Fellowships

Young Investigator Award of the Medical Faculty Heidelberg (2009)

Prizes

Roger-Bone-Award 2008 of the German Sepsis Society (2008)

Poster award of the German Sepsis Society at the „3rd International Congress Sepsis and Multiorgan Dysfunction" in Weimar (2007)

Winner of the Session “Immunology” at the “15th European Student Conference” in Berlin/Germany (2004)

Medical Student Jury Award at the „11th International Student Congress of Medical Sciences“ in Groningen/Netherlands (2004)

Fokko van der Woude- Research Grant 2010 of the German Kidney Foundation and the German Society of Nephrology

Sepsis is a common disease in intensive care. Under this condition the body reacts to infection by injuring its own tissues and organs which leads to high mortality rates. Until now reliable methods to identify vulnerable patients are lacking, and treatment is mainly directed at its symptoms. The research presented in this video focuses on endothelial progenitor cells, a cell type derived from the bone marrow circulating in the bloodstream. Their role in the development and healing of sepsis is examined. In order to quantify the endothelial progenitor cells the study uses flow cytometry – a biotechnological method to sort and count cells. The findings indicate that VEGF, the vascular endothelial growth factor, correlates with a positive outcome of the disease. These results specifying the role of endothelial progenitor cells can lead to new therapies for sepsis and may in the future also help to cure various diseases such as diabetes or strokes by supporting endothelial regeneration of the body itself.

LT Video Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.21036/LTPUB10066

Increased Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Septic Patients: Correlation with Survival

  • Neysan Rafat, Christine Hanusch, Paul T. Brinkkoetter, Jutta Schulte, Joachim Brade, Jan G. Zijlstra, Fokko J. van der Woude, Klaus van Ackern, Benito A. Yard and Grietje Ch. Beck
  • Critical Care Medicine
  • Published in 2007

Chicago

Neysan Rafat, Christine Hanusch, Paul T. Brinkkoetter, Jutta Schulte, Joachim Brade, Jan G. Zijlstra, Fokko J. van der Woude, Klaus van Ackern, Benito A. Yard and Grietje Ch. Beck. "Increased Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Septic Patients: Correlation with Survival." Critical Care Medicine 35 (2007): 1677-1684.