Marc Helbling Is There a Religious Bias Against Muslim Immigrants?

Marc Helbling is Professor of Political Sociology at the Department of Political Science at the University of Bamberg and a Research Fellow at the Berlin Social Science Center (WZB) where he was head of the Emmy-Noether research group ‚Immigration Policies in Comparison (IMPIC). He was a visiting lecturer at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University and a visiting scholar at the Centre for European Studies at Harvard University and at the Centre for European Studies at New York University. Helbling’s research is dedicated to immigration and citizenship policies, nationalism, xenophobia/islamophobia, the accommodation of Islam and right-wing populism in Europe. He was an elected member of the Young Academy at the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and received the 2011 Young Scholar Research Award from the Mayor of Berlin.

Area of Research

Political Sociology

Hanspeter Kriesi, Edgar Grande, Martin Dolezal, Marc Helbling, Dominic Höglinger, Swen Hutter and Bruno Wüest. Political Conflict in Western Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012.  
Sarah Carol, Marc Helbling and Ines Michalowski. "A Struggle Over Religious Rights? How Muslim Minorities and Natives View the Accommodation of Religious Rights in Six European Countries." Social Forces 94 (2015): 647-671.  
Marc Helbling and Hanspeter Kriesi. "Why Citizens Prefer High-Over Low-Skilled Immigrants. Labor Market Competition, Welfare State, and Deservingness." European Sociological Review 30 (2014): 595-614.  
Marc Helbling. Practising Citizenship and Heterogeneous Nationhood: Naturalisations in Swiss Municipalities. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2008.  
Marc Helbling, Tim Reeskens and Dietlind Stolle. "Political Mobilization, Cultural Diversity and Social Cohesion. The Conditional Effect of Political Parties." Political Studies 63 (2013): 101-122.  

since 2015

Full Professor of Political Sociology

University of Bamberg (Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg) (more details)

Department of Political Science

since 2013

Faculty Member

Humboldt University of Berlin (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin)

Berlin Graduate School of Social Sciences

since 2011

Head of the Emmy-Noether Research Group “Immigration Policies in Comparison”

Berlin Social Science Centre (WZB)

2014-2014

Visiting Scholar

European University Institute

2014-2014

Visiting Scholar

University of Oxford

Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS)

2014-2014

Visiting Scholar

The University of Sydney

2014-2014

Visiting Lecturer

University of Lucerne

Department for Political Science

2012-2012

Visiting Lecturer and Research Scholar

Die Junge Akademie

2011-2011

Visiting Scholar

Harvard University

Centre for European Studies

2010-2015

Elected Member

Die Junge Akademie

2010-2010

Visiting Lecturer

University of Lucerne

Department for Political Science

2009-2011

Senior Researcher

Berlin Social Science Centre (WZB)

Research unit “Migration, Integration, Transnationlization”

2008-2008

Visiting Scholar

McGill University

Department for Political Science

2007-2009

Lecturer and Researcher

University of Zurich

Center for Comparative and International Studies

2005-2006

Visiting Scholar

New York University

Centre for European Studies

2002-2007

Researcher and Teaching Assistant

University of Zurich

Center for Comparative and International Studies

2002-2002

Research Assistant

University of Lausanne

Department for Political and International Studies

2007

PhD Political Science

University of Zurich

2002

Master in Political Science

University of Lausanne

© Universität Bamberg

University of Bamberg (Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg)


The University of Bamberg, with more than 13,000 students, is among Germany‘s medium-sized universities. Its main areas of academic focus lie in the Humanities, Social Sciences, Economics, Business Administration and Human Sciences. These are rounded out by numerous programmes in application-oriented computer science. Cooperation between academia, commerce, culture and society benefits all parties: scholars investigate concrete issues and, together with their students, contribute to the implementation of potential solutions. Since the founding of the University of Bamberg in 1647, it is the people who have been its top priority. The close proximity of students and researchers provides for excellent advisory services, personal communication and interdisciplinary studies. The university currently offers roughly 100 programmes at the bachelor‘s and master‘s level. (Source: University of Bamberg)

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The research presented in this video explores attitudes towards immigrants and their religious rights in Western societies, based on survey data. MARC HELBLING finds that religiosity and liberal values are key variables: Individuals with liberal values are generally more tolerant towards immigrants – but tolerate religious rights less. Religious people by contrast are less tolerant towards immigrants – but more open towards their religious rights. This suggests that religion still shapes the way social issues are dealt with.

LT Video Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.21036/LTPUB10042

Opposing Muslims and the Muslim Headscarf in Western Europe

  • Marc Helbling
  • European Sociological Review
  • Published in 2014

Chicago

Marc Helbling. "Opposing Muslims and the Muslim Headscarf in Western Europe." European Sociological Review (2014).