Martin S. Fischer How is the Form of Limbs in Dogs Related to their Function?

Martin S. Fischer is Chair and Director of the Institute of Zoology and Evolutionary Biology at Friedrich Schiller University Jena. His commitment to the investigation of the workings of motion has led to the development of fluoroscopy. In turn, this research generated a vast collection of X-ray movies of animals in motion at the Institute. His findings on the locomotion of animals, especially that of dogs, have had considerable influence on the way it is viewed in veterinary medicine.

Area of Research

Evolutionary Biology

since 1993

Chair and Director

Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena)

Institute for Zoology and Evolutionary Biology

1987-1993

Research Assistant

University of Tübingen (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen)

1986-1987

Research Assistant

Goethe University of Frankfurt (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)

since 2018

Honorary Doctorate (Veterinary Medicine)

Justus Liebig University Giessen (Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen)

1993

Habilitation in Zoology

University of Tübingen (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen)

1986

PhD

University of Tübingen (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen)

Institute of Zoology

Prizes

- Förderpreis der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Säugetierkunde 1986 (German Society for Mammalian Biology)

Looking at bones, joints or muscles, their function is not necessarily clear from their form. MARTIN S. FISCHER’s overarching research interest has always been the integration of form and function and the function of motion. In this video, he explains how locomotion, how animals and humans move, influences all locomotor operators. To examine the function of form the researchers need to study form during motion. For this, they use fluoroscopy (high-speed X-rays), EMG’s of muscles and observe the overall behavior of the experimental subject. This gives them the opportunity to study the three-dimensional function of limbs. They have had numerous findings, among them the mismatch of the terminology of human muscles applied to dogs; another one concerns the reason for the zigzag shape of birds’ legs. Their findings have multiple implications, for instance in the development of treatments in veterinary medicine.

LT Video Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.21036/LTPUB10591

Three-dimensional Inverse Dynamics of the Forelimb of Beagles at a Walk and Trot

  • E. Andrada, L. Reinhardt, K. Lucas and Martin S. Fischer
  • American Journal of Veterinary Research
  • Published in 2017
E. Andrada, L. Reinhardt, K. Lucas and Martin S. Fischer. "Three-dimensional Inverse Dynamics of the Forelimb of Beagles at a Walk and Trot." American Journal of Veterinary Research 78, 7 (2017): 804-817.

The Dental Phenotype of Hairless Dogs with FOXI3 Haploinsufficiency

  • Kornelius Kupczik, Alexander Cagan, Silke Brauer and Martin S. Fischer
  • Scientific Reports
  • Published in 2017
Kornelius Kupczik, Alexander Cagan, Silke Brauer and Martin S. Fischer. "The Dental Phenotype of Hairless Dogs with FOXI3 Haploinsufficiency." Scientific Reports 7 (2017).

A Biologically Based Neural System Coordinates the Joints and Legs of a Tetrapod

  • Alexander Hunt, Manuela Schmidt, Martin Fischer and Roger Quinn
  • Bioinspiration & Biomimetics
  • Published in 2015
Alexander Hunt, Manuela Schmidt, Martin Fischer and Roger Quinn. "A Biologically Based Neural System Coordinates the Joints and Legs of a Tetrapod." Bioinspiration & Biomimetics 10, 5 (2015): 1-10.

Lahmheitsuntersuchung beim Hund

  • D. Koch and M. S. Fischer
  • Published in 2015
D. Koch and M. S. Fischer. Lahmheitsuntersuchung beim Hund. Stuttgart: Enke Verlag, 2015.

Dogs in Motion

  • M. S. Fischer and K. E. Lilje
  • Published in 2011
M. S. Fischer and K. E. Lilje. Dogs in Motion. Dortmund: VDH Service GmbH, 2011.