Eberhard Bodenschatz How Can the Statistical Properties of a Turbulent Flow Be Calculated?

Eberhard Bodenschatz is Chair of the Chemistry, Physics and Technology Section and Member of the Senate of the Max Planck Society as well as Director of the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen, Germany. Bodenschatz is also an Adjunct Professor at Cornell University (USA) where he has held several faculty positions in experimental physics since 1992. His research interests include self-organizing complex systems and electrophysiological turbulence. Bodenschatz is a recipient of the Stanley Corrsin Award of the American Physical Society and the Alfred P. Sloan foundation fellowship among others. In 2016, he became also a Member of the Board of the German Physical Society.

Area of Research

Biocomplexity, Self-Organizing Complex Systems, Electrophysiological Turbulence

since 2014

Chair of the Chemistry, Physics and Technology Section

Max Planck Society

since 2007

Full Professor of Physics

University of Göttingen (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen)

since 2005

Director

Max Planck Society (more details)

Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization

since 2005

Professor

Cornell University

Department of Physics & Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

2012-2014

Deputy Chair and Chair Elect of the Chemistry, Physics and Technology Section

Max Planck Society

2011-2013

Managing Director

Max Planck Society (more details)

Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization

2005-2007

Managing Director

Max Planck Society (more details)

Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization

2003-2005

Scientific Member

Max Planck Society (more details)

Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization

2003-2005

Full Professor of Physics

Cornell University

1998-2002

Associate Professor of Physics

Cornell University

1999-2000

Visiting Scholar

University of California, San Diego

1995

Visiting Scholar

Max Planck Society (more details)

Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research

1992-1998

Assistant Professor of Physics

Cornell University

1989-1992

Postdoctoral Associate

University of California, Santa Barbara

1989

PhD in Theoretical Physics

University of Bayreuth (Universität Bayreuth)

1985

Diploma in Theoretical Physics

University of Bayreuth (Universität Bayreuth)

American Physical Society

American Association for the Advancement of Science

Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft

Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Ärzte

Institute of Physics

European Mechanics Society

Union of Concerned Scientists

Prizes

Stanley Corrsin Award of the American Physical Society (2014)

Publication Price of the Deutsche Museum (2012)

Fellowships

Linné FLOW Centre Lecture, KTH (2013)

Crocco Colloquium Lectureship, Princeton University (2011)

Einstein Colloquium Lectureship, Weizmann Institute (2007)

Creativity Extension NSF-PHY for Turbulence Research (2003)

Cottrell Scholar, Research Corporation (1995)

Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow (1993)

Research Fellowship Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (1989-1991)

© Maximilian Dörrbecker

Max Planck Society


"The Max Planck Society is Germany's most successful research organization. Since its establishment in 1948, no fewer than 18 Nobel laureates have emerged from the ranks of its scientists, putting it on a par with the best and most prestigious research institutions worldwide. The more than 15,000 publications each year in internationally renowned scientific journals are proof of the outstanding research work conducted at Max Planck Institutes – and many of those articles are among the most-cited publications in the relevant field." (Source)

Institute

Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization

"The Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPIDS) belongs to the Max Planck Society. Its research focus is in physics, with strong interdisciplinary aspects. It emerged in 2004 from the Max Planck Institute for Fluid Dynamics. In 2011 it moved from the Bunsenstrasse in Göttingen to the Max Planck Campus at Fassberg, located between the main town of Göttingen and its suburb Nikolausberg. The MPIDS is now right next to the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, with which it already had and continues to have cooperations in interdisciplinary areas between physics, biology and medicine. There is also a close connection with the Faculty of Physics at the University of Göttingen.

The MPIDS consists of three departments. Besides that, there are presently three independent Max Planck Research Groups at the institute." (Source)

Map

For more than one hundred years, scientists have been working to uncover how turbulent flows occur. This would enable them among other things to predict how pollutants spread in water or how pollen travel in air. As EBERHARD BODENSCHATZ explains in this video, new insights are offered by an approach based on Lagrangian Particle Tracking Technique: The researchers focused on a single particle in a fluid and followed it through the flow, using tracers both numerically and experimentally. By tracking more than three thousand particles at a given time, the researchers derived statistics of the particle motion in the flow. In this way, they are able to predict turbulences in the flow and prove that these turbulences are irreversible. This irreversibility, in turn, shows that vortex stretching is really at the basis of a turbulent flow.

LT Video Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.21036/LTPUB10273

Lagrangian View of Time Irreversibility of Fluid Turbulence

  • Haitao Xu, Alain Pumir and Eberhard Bodenschatz
  • Science China Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
  • Published in 2016

Chicago

Haitao Xu, Alain Pumir and Eberhard Bodenschatz. "Lagrangian View of Time Irreversibility of Fluid Turbulence." Science China Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy 59 (2016): 1-9.